Table 1.—Contributions to Change in Gross Domestic Product, 1954:II-1957:III, Using Chained (1992) Dollars and Chained (1955:IV) Chained Dollars

Line Contribution to change in GDP, 1992=100 (percent) Contribution to change in GDP, 1955:IV=100 (percent) Difference
(1) (2) (1)-(2)
1 Gross domestic product 100.0 100.0 0
2 Personal consumption expenditures 67.4 67.2 .2
3 Durable goods 5.8 10.5 -4.7
4 Nondurable goods 26.8 29.1 -2.2
5 Services 34.6 27.6 7.1
6 Gross private domestic investment 21.7 28.1 -6.4
7 Fixed investment 13.4 16.3 -2.9
8 Nonresidential 11.5 15.2 -3.7
9 Structures 5.5 5.1 .5
10 Producers' durable equipment 6.2 10.1 -3.9
11 Residential .9 .9 0
12 Change in business inventories/1/
13 Exports of goods and services 8.2 10.7 -2.4
14 Goods 5.9 8.5 -2.5
15 Services 2.1 2.2 -.1
16 Imports of goods and services -6.0 -6.0 -12.1
17 Goods -3.1 -3.3 -6.4
18 Services -2.9 -2.8 -5.7
19 Government consumption expenditures and gross investment .3 .2 .1
20 Federal -13.7 -11.1 -2.6
21 National defense -10.3 -8.2 -2.1
22 Defense -3.6 -3.0 -.7
23 State and local 15.1 11.1 4.0
24 Residual (line 1 less lines 2, 6, 13, 16, 19)/1/ 8.4 -.1 8.5

1. Because change in business inventories (CBI) is the difference between two inventory series and can be either positive or negative, chain-type indexes cannot be constructed for it. Without a separate index, chained-dollars for CBI were not constructed using the method described in the note acccompanying this article (though the value is included in gross private domestic investment). Because no separate values for CBI are constructed in this table, the residual can be calculated only at the major component level. In the NIPA's, chained (1992) dollar values for CBI are calculated from inventory stock series that have been derived using the same chain-type formula that is used to calculate other aggregates.